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Why investing time into recruitment is so important for companies

Why investing time into recruitment is so important for companies

The hiring process is just that, it takes time to make the right assessments across technical skills and cultural fit into your business. However, so many companies can be ‘too busy’ to hire or just don’t see the value investing the time to work in partnership with recruitment companies. This means the crucial first steps of fully understanding what the requirement is, what the dealbreakers are, and what can/can’t be flexed in the ‘wish list’, can detriment the rest of the process, making it more time consuming. 

We have included below our key points to consider when recruiting:

  1. Feedback both ways is important, this enables for tweaks to be made to the search if needed to find the right candidate. For example, feeding back to the client if the salary bracket isn’t aligned with the current market
  2. The effect to the business in having the role vacant can be very costly and when you’re solely focussed on filling a role asap, the longer-term perspective can be overlooked 
  3. Having a high volume of CV’s sent over defies the point of working with a recruitment company, especially when it is from multiple recruiters. This doesn’t increase the chance of hiring the position, you will ultimately be spending more time going through a lot of CVs that aren’t right for the role
  4. The same role in one company will likely differ to another company due to factors such as the size of the company, whether they are part of a larger group, reporting lines in the business, sector differences etc so the recruiter should want to understand what this looks like in your business, approaching the role as a bespoke project.

At Delve, we will always aim to get the crucial information from our clients in person at the start, this enables us to see the environment for ourselves, understand the right person to fit to the business and build a transparent relationship with the client moving forwards.

For further information on our bespoke approach to engineering recruitment, visit our Engineering page or contact us on +44 (0)1606 212 020.

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Clients

Why you shouldn’t wait until January to make your next hire

Why you shouldn’t wait until January to make your next hire

As we approach the end of 2022, the winding down for the festive period begins and businesses have started the planning and preparation for the new year.  

However, before the year draws to a close, there is still a great opportunity to make one final push and secure your candidates now. Here are for 3 key reasons to start ahead of the festive period.

1. Get ahead of your competition

Since your competitors will likely start interviewing in January, hiring in advance gives you an opportunity to attract a pool of talent that isn’t being engaged. They’re open to new employment, available to be picked up for their array of skills – and you’re the only one looking for them. You can capitalise on the delayed approach of your competitors by being active now, be the early bird that gets the best worm. 

Companies hiring in January must also be extra-competitive with job offers and move very quickly to even get a shot at securing their preferred candidates. Come January, you’ll be calmly conducting inductions while they’re frantically finding time to interview. You also won’t be competing with newly released budgets in Q1!

2. Budgets – use it before you lose it

Something to bear in mind, companies keep their budget close to their chest throughout the year, they predominately do not like spending it until they must, due to this you likely haven’t hired as aggressively in Q1, Q2 and Q3, which could mean you have some budget left. 

If that’s the case, then even more reason to make the most of remaining budget and use it now before you lose it and the year ends – make your hires by the end of December and start 2023 with a fresh budget intact.

3. Time – now is the best time to act

As the end of the year approaches and businesses begin to wind down, you can make use of the time as a great opportunity to complete your hiring objectives, interviewing and hitting that target you’ve been eager to reach, finally over the line. 

With a new year comes new responsibility, new targets, and new tasks to add to our list. Why not focus your attention on hiring now, instead of leaving it for the new year rush when you have new priorities to tackle after the Christmas break.  

Speak to our team to see how we can support you with your recruitment needs, whether it’s an immediate hire or to get the ball rolling for 2023, we are here to help.

Call us on +44 (0)1606 212020 or email [email protected].

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Candidates

Best practice interview prep

Best practice interview prep

Sometimes the big obstacle can be getting the interview in the first place, but now you have one or maybe multiple interviews lined up, what is the best way to give yourself the maximum chance of getting the job? Here are our key pointers, based on our experience over the years, to help give you the best chance…

Preparation is key – The age old ‘fail to prepare, prepare to fail’. It may sound so obvious, but I can’t stress how important it is to research the company so you can answer the almost guaranteed question of ‘what do you know about us?’ Use the information to think about why you want the job too, employers tend to want to know what has drawn you to their company.

Check the route – Even do a trial run if required, and check there are no issues with the roads on the day. If something unexpected does arise, make sure you have the contact number of the company or recruitment consultant in your phone to call ahead in a worst-case scenario.

Wear appropriate interview clothing – Unless told otherwise, always go in smart wear. In some instances, it may be relevant to wear casual wear dependant on the role, but you are better to be overdressed than underdressed! This may seem obvious, but I’ve seen people turn up in casual wear despite being advised that smart wear is appropriate, and it will usually be a dealbreaker from a first impressions point of view.

Attitude – Many companies we work with will hire on attitude rather than putting skills first, so how you come across based on your attitude, work ethic, body language and interpersonal skills can be more important – you can teach skills, but you can’t teach a good attitude…remember to smile!

Ask questions – This shows you are interested in what they do as a company and gets the conversation flowing in terms of what is familiar to you, from a transferability point of view, or what is new, to show interest. Also, be verbal on company/shop floor tours. Remember, this is a two-way assessment, you need to make sure you have the information you need to decide if it is the right fit for you not just the other way around.

Avoid being negative about previous employers – We all have our own reasons for leaving a company, just make sure it is delivered in a way that doesn’t come across negative to a future employer. In life there are always positives that come from negatives so focus on the positives e.g., the new skills learnt. 

Avoid asking directly about salary – It can come across that motivations perhaps aren’t aligned, plus you should have this information from the recruitment consultancy in advance. If the interviewer asks the question though, have the conversation and answer with honest expectations, don’t let it catch you off guard.

At Delve, we work closely with our clients to be able to support our candidates as much as possible about what to expect in terms of the interview format etc but also crucially gather feedback post interview. If you feel like you haven’t got the information you need, don’t be afraid to ask!

For further information contact Louise Shorrock, Client Manager at Delve Search via LinkedIn or email.

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Candidates Clients Uncategorized

Recruiting women into STEM roles

Recruiting women into STEM roles

The STEM industry has become a much more inclusive and diverse market, with individuals from a variety of backgrounds and cultures studying and working in the industry. However, there is still more to be done to make STEM more appealing for women.

Early exposure – As with most things, early exposure is crucial to sparking interest. One step to attracting more women to STEM is creating environments in schools that invite young women into STEM subjects. Schools and colleges need to advertise STEM to boys and girls equally, creating a balanced environment for all to start their STEM journey.

Positive role models – As well as this, ensuring that young women have positive role models from within the STEM community will showcase the future opportunities and help them to visualise a career in the industry. Having positive female role models and mentors who are working in STEM is a great way for prospective STEM employees to learn, explore and develop through advice and inspiration.

Gender pay gap – The industry needs to do more once women are in employment. Closing the gender pay gap is still an important topic in most industries and although STEM is one of the leading industries for equal pay, there is still a gap that needs bridging between male and female colleagues’ pay. There also needs to be a more balanced representation of women at the top – companies don’t just need to pay their employees equal wages; they also need to open opportunities for women to take higher positions at the top of businesses. By showcasing routes to the top, women can enter the industry with the confidence that they can progress and have equal opportunities to their male counter parts.

Our team would be happy to hear your challenges in recruiting women into STEM roles and support you with potential solutions. For further information call us on +44 (0) 1606 212020 or email [email protected].

 

 

Categories
Candidates

How to kickstart a career in engineering

How to kickstart a career in engineering

The engineering industry is always adapting as new technologies are developed making way for some interesting job opportunities. Check out our guide on how to kickstart your career in engineering!

Do your research 

If you know which type of company you want to work for, make sure you research them. Find out about their company values, what products or services they provide and what development opportunities they offer employees. 

Follow the types of companies you want to work for. If you’re going for an interview, it’s always a plus point if you know your facts! 

Look beyond the pay packet 

It’s not all about the money you’ll be earning. At the end of the day, money doesn’t always make you happy! It’s a lot more than that. For example, are there progression opportunities available, will you receive training and development, are the employees nice and easy to get on and work with? 

 These are all important questions that are sometimes overlooked. Think about what you really want out of an engineering job – and what’s most important to you. This will make it easier to find a role that ticks all the boxes.  

Make your skills and personality stand out 

Here at Delve, we have a beyond the paper approach, we’ve seen thousands of engineering CVs and most of them look exactly the same. What we are looking for is something that makes you stand out from the rest. 

What key skills or achievements do you have? The key skills that recruiters are currently looking for are team players, curiosity, ambition, good communicators, problem solvers, adaptability, and creativity. If you can show a recruiter that you have these skills, then make sure you shout about it! 

Get your foot in the door 

If you know of a particular company that you want to work for, call them! Put yourself out there, be a bit cheeky and ask them if they need volunteers. Gaining work experience can really help to kick start your career in engineering. 

After all, you could see what it’s like working there and which areas of engineering you might be interested in. This is a really good way of developing skills and building a network of useful contacts, and it looks good on your CV too! 

Keep your head up 

Finally, don’t give up! If it’s something you really want, then keep going. We all get knock-backs in life, but what makes you stronger is how you get up, deal with it, and move on. 

Engineering can be a very exciting sector to work in, so why don’t you give it a go? 

To find out more about how we can support you call us on +44 (0)1606 212020 or email [email protected].

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Clients

Where is the young talent?

Where Is The Young Talent?

The BBC have reported what I believe most of us suspected and that is that manufacturing is growing at a fast rate. Activity in the manufacturing sector has actually grown at its fastest pace for three years according to the Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI).

This is great news for all of us who operate in the sector, but it’s also not without its problems. There is still an important question to be asked: will there be enough skills to allow the growth to continue? Trade skills, specifically electrical and controls engineering are at a real premium, with companies fighting over experienced talent. With many people leaving the sector through retirement or progression into other, more lucrative areas, maintenance engineering has struggled to attract the right amount of talent. Data suggests there is a current shortage of 69,000 engineers and technicians entering the sector. I’d argue that there are not many better learning opportunities for a young engineer than working in the manufacturing sector – the degree can come later, should you so wish.

Apprenticeships are on the rise – but is enough being done to ensure we have the talent? With so many different degrees available costing thousands of pounds and with little vocational experience gained at the end of the four years, isn’t it now up to the government to convince more companies and young people with the relevant abilities to consider starting their careers with manufacturing apprenticeships?

Employers and recruiters have a responsibility. We need to ensure the proposition is attractive and is sold to the right people. If all we do is continually search and move the experienced candidates in the industry around, we will not create the environment needed for young people to succeed. We must actively work together to provide young people the opportunity to learn.

There are no quick fixes. However, we as stakeholders in the industry can make a difference if we stop chasing the short-term wins.

Delve work with candidates and clients to create realistic expectations and improve succession planning with our clients. To find out more, feel free to contact a member of our team.

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Candidate onboarding – where to start?

Candidate Onboarding - Where To Start?

It’s reported that one in three people experience poor onboarding when they are joining a new business. One in three. Wow. As someone who is hiring, just think about all the pain that goes with finding that person. All of the time, money, and blood, sweat and tears. Then they start, and due to bad onboarding you have already given them reasons to think that this isn’t right for them.

As a recruiter, I hear great onboarding stories and hear horrendous onboarding stories. I hear vanilla ones as well, the ones that people forget the moment they leave the room. So, how can we combat this and put our best foot forward, I hear you say? Well, say no more…

It all starts with the interview. This will sound crazy, and you may think this is so obvious that it’s pointless to even write it. But here goes… Don’t lie. If you lie to get someone through the door, you are setting yourself up for failure. Simple. Now, understand this: I’m not saying be critical of your business to the point that they think it’s the worst place they have ever seen and would never step foot in the door again. But do tell them about the opportunity to address challenges within their role. “Yes, our business isn’t perfect and we are aware of some of the challenges. We see this role solving some of those challenges by implementing X, Y and Z”. No lies. Just honest, transparent opportunity. 

Right. You operate with transparency and honesty and the candidate accepts your challenge. This is where your induction starts. As a recruiter, I will tell you first-hand that time kills deals. Resigning from a job can be the most daunting thing many people will do. So please, please, please try to be there for your new employee. Give them a call and ask them how they are doing. Ask if they would like to pop in and meet the team? Tell them you’re having a couple of drinks on Friday and it would be great if they could come along. Do anything that would suit you and your company, but keep in contact. The chances are that after a resignation, your chosen candidate will be asking themselves if they have done the right thing – show them that they have.

Next, get your tech and merch ordered ASAP. Laptop, phone, keyboard, pens, papers, phone list, brochures, merchandise, employee profiles, chocolates, mug, business card holder – you name it, get it ordered. There’s nothing worse than turning up on day one and nothing being ready. Then, send diary requests to the people you want your new employee to meet on day one. Plan it in, and make sure you talk to people face-to-face to check that they know what you need from them and that they understand the plan.

Once everything is set, sit back, grab a brew and phone your future employee to check they are okay (again), and then confirm the start time with them. It’s also worth pointing out dress code and what people typically wear. It may sound silly, but people worry about these things.

Day 1, 10.00am, they arrive (always ask them to arrive later than you). Their desk is set, laptop waiting, phone plugged in, and there’s merchandise everywhere. Show them to their desk. Introduce them to people. Walk them around and make them known to everyone who is available. The more the merrier. Remember your first day in a job? You will forget 99% of the names but the face is at least familiar. Show them where the tea and coffee is, how to work the annoying vending machine and the best sandwich shop in town. Make them feel like you actually want them there.

Execute your well-planned induction covering the history of the business, future growth plans, and in what way their role and team is crucial to your success. 

The small details count. If you’re a line manager, give them your mobile number, take them for regular one-to-ones and set an appraisal date three months from now. Engage your new super hire. Create the environment where they will motivate themselves.

The detail behind the actual onboarding is a different blog all together, but hopefully this highlights that you have the power to make that candidate journey brilliant from the second they sit in that first interview, or even beforehand.

If you’re keen to ensure your onboarding runs like clockwork then I’d be delighted to hear from you[email protected].

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Uncategorized

International recruitment

International Recruitment

I am often asked by my candidates and clients why I am based in the UK but support the European and American market. It always brings a smile to my face and being honest, there are a couple of reasons why we have this offering.

Beyond the Paper

It’s our mantra. It drives us to do what we do every single day. We constantly ask one another, “have you got the detail?” Or in other words, do we understand what we can’t see on a job profile or CV? This process doesn’t change for roles that are based in the UK, Europe, USA or even on the moon! We have a strict way of operating that enhances our success rates for candidates and clients alike. Taking this process to other countries and utilising technology platforms means that we can be successful wherever we recruit.

Process

Our clients love to work with us and after doing so, they love our process and best practice. It helps them to organise diary availability and have assurances that once we have taken a brief, we have a deadline for delivery. In essence, once you have spoken with us, you can remove the role from your radar for the coming days. Similar to our work in the UK, these processes don’t change wherever you are based.

Opportunity

We found that lots of our UK clients were asking us for European support on their requirements. The growth and next step seemed logical and like something we could do to offer a wider selection of services to our growing customer portfolio.

Network

Sourcing top talent is just as tough wherever you go within the engineering and technical community. In this quest to find great people, we were searching globally for talent, thus building up a unique and desirable network of contacts. It made sense for us to engage with like-minded people and organisations worldwide, with the goal being to support their needs.

Overall, we have found that blending our uniquely designed and proven recruitment processes with our well-defined and established network allows us to have a global offering without compromise.

To learn more, contact Gareth directly at [email protected]

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Is your recruitment partner working for your business?

Is Your Recruitment Partner Working For Your Business?

Sometimes, relationships can break down and one party starts to provide more than the other. This is true in all aspects of life but in business it can be particularly damaging to your bottom line. When you are trying to scale your business and move forward, hiring the right people is often the most critical aspect, but it can often be time-consuming and
effort- and resource-intensive to secure the right person. Ask yourself the questions below in order to work out whether your recruitment partner is the right person to meet your business needs.

1 – Are they attentive? Ultimately this is a partnership and you don’t want to create a master – slave relationship. However, the recruitment company you engage with are providing a service, and they should therefore be prompt, clear and open about what they will do by when. If you feel like you are getting five-star service, that really is a great starting point.

2 – Do they actively listen? This is really important. Sales is a tough gig and I often hear examples of recruiters wanting to sell to customers rather than listen. The key to success with your recruitment partner is for them to listen and understand your problems and then challenge you to create solutions.

3 – Are they timely? Look, a thorough recruitment process takes time. A no-stone-unturned approach is not a quick fix. However, your chosen recruitment partner should outline timescales for delivery or at least provide a review on how they are progressing. This gives you peace of mind that the process is working towards a deadline but also allows for any issues to be captured and dealt with in a timely manner.

4 – Do you like dealing with them? This is purely down to individual preference but you have to like who you work with. If you are finding it a slog and see the recruiter you are working with as a necessary evil, then it should be time to consider your options.

5 – Do they deliver? Ultimately it all boils down to delivery. Do they solve your problems by delivering great people who fit the brief on time and in a professional way? And if not, do they add value by telling you what to do to solve your problems? In a candidate-short market, it may not be down to the recruiter you are using, but the proposition you are asking them to take to the market. If this is the case, you need to know so that this can be addressed.

There are numerous things to consider when choosing your recruitment partner or reflecting on the one you are working with at the moment. My advice would be start with the above and if you are still in a position of questioning the results, then perhaps it’s time to consider a new option. For an open discussion call Gareth Foden on +44 1606 212 020.

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Uncategorized

Reviewing candidate profiles: why every minute counts

Reviewing Candidate Profiles: Why Every Minute Counts

We recently talked to Client Manager Louise Shorrock about how important it is to offer feedback on candidate profiles in a timely manner when working with a recruiter. Here are her thoughts on the time-sensitive nature of recruitment and how hiring managers can make this work to their advantage.

How can time become an issue in the recruitment process?

As recruiters we often find ourselves in a catch-22 situation: the hiring manager is overwhelmed with work and desperately needs to hire another team member in order to be able to focus on their own role, but because they are so busy, they are unable to invest the time needed to play their part in the recruitment process. 

What kind of difficulties can this lead to?

Candidates can become frustrated with a slow hiring process to the extent that they disengage completely. Conversely, the faster you are able to provide feedback on candidate profiles, the more likely it is that you will hire a top candidate, as those candidates know their worth and will simultaneously be looking for roles in different companies. The most sought-after candidates are more likely to be snapped up quickly, so time is of the essence.

Are there any other consequences that hiring managers should be aware of? 

Yes. Any delays in the early stages of a search can and do multiply: waiting several days after the agreed timeframe to send feedback on an initial presentation of candidate profiles could easily lead to a delay of weeks or more, as some or all of the candidates presented may no longer be available, which means your recruiter will have to begin their search again and find new candidates.

It’s also important to note that delays in the review process have an impact on candidates’ perceptions of both the hiring company and the recruiter involved. As your recruiter will be communicating regularly with candidates and keeping them informed of their progress, when a delay occurs, their correspondence with candidates effectively becomes a series of ‘no-update updates’. This creates a bad impression for both parties and ultimately this could cause a candidate to question whether they would want to work for you as an employer.

Can all of this be avoided? How?

The key is in the communication between the recruiter and the hiring manager. I personally will discuss and agree on expectations at the beginning of a search campaign, including an agreed-upon time limit for profile reviews. Once that time has elapsed, I then know to follow up with the hiring manager to remind them to give feedback. This works as a kind of unofficial Service Level Agreement between both parties to make sure the process keeps moving forward. I would also always make sure that I have the contact details of more than one person who is involved in the hiring process in case delays occur as a result of unexpected absences.

Is there any other advice you would offer to hiring managers?

From our perspective, any feedback on potential candidates is good feedback. Even if the feedback is negative, this can help your recruiter home in on what’s important to you, and it can shape discussions on whether the salary offered is going to match the skillset needed, for example. I will always aim to find and present one or two candidates relatively early in the search process, as the feedback helps me to gauge the parameters and allows me to find better suited candidates.

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